5 examples of strange architecture Milan

Colourful Houses

Via Lincoln

East

Here, the houses are yellow, lilac, green and red. This former working-class neighbourhood from the late 19th century was perhaps intended as a garden city. Today it continues to be a small and colourful corner of Milan. Take a walk among the fruit trees and the small palm trees. Magical.

Le Abbadesse Di Milano

North-West

A little slice of history of the Cassin Baess, as the Milanese call it, which dates from the 11th century. There used to be a convent here and some very old farmhouses, in the countryside. Today only the small church remains, tucked in between modern buildings.

Maggiolina District

North-West
This residential neighbourhood, with its terraced houses and period buildings, includes some really unique homes, such as the 1970s igloos and a stilt house – a rationalist design by the architect Luigi Figini. In the 1940s, you could also find mushroom-shaped houses here (since demolished), a flight of fancy by an engineer named Cavallé.

Ca'Longa

Via Piero della Francesca 34 North-West

This used to be the village of the scigolat, the greengrocers. This house is a 19th-century farmhouse. It was probably used as a post office, with stables for horses, and was only subsequently transformed into a casa di ringhiera, that is a typical Milanese tenement with shared balconies.

Houses by Terragni

Isola

Many examples of 1930s Milanese Rationalism can be found in the Isola neighbourhood, including a design by Giuseppe Terragni. Others include Casa Ghiringhelli (Piazzale Lagosta 2), Casa Comolli-Rustici (Via Guglielmo Pepe 32), near the railway tracks (similar to the one in Corso Sempione, near Via Procaccini) and Casa Toninello (Via Perasto 3), which is also the smallest.